Who Was Madam C.J. Walker? – Day 2 of Black History Month 

 

Madam Walker, the First Black American Woman to Be a Self-Made Millionaire

 

As an African American curly-headed woman and social entrepreneur I am excited to share this story with you my readers. Not only for the sake of this being Black History Month, yet for the deep sense of inspiration that Madam Walker offers our organization in the establishment of our new salon and community wellness center.  Being a beauty culturist myself for over 18 years, and a native of Indianapolis, Indiana, I grow up with the ability to walk into the historical building where all her magic was manufactured. Now labeled a 

As I explained in my memoir, Colored People, “So many black people still get their hair straightened that it’s a wonder we don’t have a national holiday for Madame C.J. Walker, who invented the process for straightening kinky hair, rather than for Dr. King.” I was joking, of course, but mostly about the holiday; the history and politics of African-American hair have been as charged as any “do” in our culture, and somewhere in the story, Madam C.J. Walker usually makes an appearance.

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Madam C.J. Walker. Photo courtesy A’Lelia Bundles/Madam Walker Family Collection.

Most people who’ve heard of her will tell you one or two things: She was the first black millionairess, and she invented the world’s first hair-straightening formula and/or the hot comb. Only one is factual, sort of, but the amazing story behind it and how Madam Walker used that accomplishment to help others as a job creator and philanthropist might be jarring — and surprisingly empowering — even to the skeptics. I know it was for me in revisiting her life for this column.

Thanks to the work of numerous historians, among them Madam Walker’s prolific great-granddaughter, A’Lelia Bundles, as well as Nancy Koehn and my colleagues at Harvard Business School, I no longer see one straight line from “Madam Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower” to current menus of extensions, braids and weaves; nor do I see a single line connecting this brilliant, determined person — who struggled doggedly for a life out of poverty, and for black beauty, pride and her own legitimacy (in the face of black male resistance) as a black business woman during the worst of the Jim Crow era — to the most successful black women on the stage today.

 “Up From” Sarah Breedlove

On December 23, 1867, Sarah Breedlove was born to two former slaves on a plantation in Delta, La., just a few months after the second Juneteenth was celebrated one state over in Texas. While the rest of her siblings had been born on the other side of emancipation, Sarah was free. But by 7, she was an orphan toiling in those same cotton fields. To escape her abusive brother-in-law’s household, Sarah married at 14, and together she and Moses McWilliams had one daughter, Lelia (later “A’Lelia Walker”), before Moses mysteriously died.

Now that Reconstruction, too, was dead in the South, Sarah moved north to St. Louis, where a few of her brothers had taken up as barbers, themselves having left the Delta as “exodusters” some years before. Living on $1.50 a day as a laundress and cook, Sarah struggled to send Lelia to school — and did — while joining the A.M.E. church, where she networked with other city dwellers, including those in the fledgling National Association of Colored Women.

In 1894, Sarah tried marrying again, but her second husband, John Davis, was less than reliable, and he was unfaithful. At 35, her life remained anything but certain. “I was at my tubs one morning with a heavy wash before me,” she later told the New York Times. “As I bent over the washboard and looked at my arms buried in soapsuds, I said to myself: ‘What are you going to do when you grow old and your back gets stiff? Who is going to take care of your little girl?’ ”

Adding to Sarah’s woes was the fact that she was losing her hair. As her great-granddaughter A’Lelia Bundles explains in an essay she posted on America.gov’s Archive: “During the early 1900s, when most Americans lacked indoor plumbing and electricity, bathing was a luxury. As a result, Sarah and many other women were going bald because they washed their hair so infrequently, leaving it vulnerable to environmental hazards such as pollution, bacteria and lice.”

In the lead-up to the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis, Sarah’s personal and professional fortune began to turn when she discovered the “The Great Wonderful Hair Grower” of Annie Turnbo(later Malone), an Illinois native with a background in chemistry who’d relocated her hair-straightening business to St. Louis. It more than worked, and within a year Sarah went from using Turnbo’s products to selling them as a local agent. Perhaps not coincidentally, around the same time, she began dating Charles Joseph (“C.J.”) Walker, a savvy salesman for the St. Louis Clarion.

A little context and review: Along the indelible color line that court cases like Plessy v. Ferguson drew, blacks in turn-of-the-century America were excluded from most trade unions and denied bank capital, resulting in trapped lives as sharecroppers or menial, low-wage earners. One of the only ways out, as my colleague Nancy Koehn and others reveal in their2007 study of Walker, was to start a business in a market segmented by Jim Crow. Hair care and cosmetics fit the bill. The start-up costs were low. Unlike today’s big multinationals, white businesses were slow to respond to blacks’ specific needs. And there was a slew of remedies to improve upon from well before slavery. Turnbo saw this opportunity and, in creating her “Poro” brand, seized it as part of a larger movement that witnessed the launch of some 10,000 to 40,000 black-owned businesses between 1883 and 1913. Now it was Sarah’s turn.

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The Walker System

While still a Turnbo agent, Sarah stepped out of her boss’ shadow in 1905 by relocating to Denver, where her sister-in-law’s family resided (apparently, she’d heard black women’s hair suffered in the Rocky Mountains’ high but dry air). C.J. soon followed, and in 1906 the two made it official — marriage No. 3 and a new business start — with Sarah officially changing her name to “Madam C.J. Walker.”

Around the same time, she awoke from a dream, in which, in her words: “A big black man appeared to me and told me what to mix up for my hair. Some of the remedy was grown in Africa, but I sent for it, put it on my scalp, and in a few weeks my hair was coming in faster than it had ever fallen out.” It was to be called “Madam Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower.” Her initial investment: $1.25.

Sarah’s industry had its critics, among them the leading black institution-builder of the day, Booker T. Washington, who worried (to his credit) that hair-straighteners (and, worse, skin-bleaching creams) would lead to the internalization of white concepts of beauty. Perhaps she was mindful of this, for she was deft in communicating that her dream was not emulative of whites, but divinely inspired, and, like Turnbo’s “Poro Method,” African in origin.

However, Walker went a step further. You see, the name Poro “came from a West African term for a devotional society, reflecting Turnbo’s concern for the welfare and the roots of the women she served,” according to a 2007 Harvard Business School case study. Whereas Turnbo took her product’s name from an African word, Madame C.J. claimed that the crucial ingredients for her product were African in origin. (And on top of that, she gave it a name uncomfortably close to Turnbo’s “Wonderful Hair Grower.”)

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It wouldn’t be the only permanent sticking point between the two: Some claim it was Turnbo, not Walker, who became the first black woman to reach a million bucks. One thing about her startup was different, however: Walker’s brand, with the “Madam” in front, had the advantage of French cache, while defying many white people’s tendency to refer to black women by their first names, or, worse, as “Auntie.”

Of course, many would-be entrepreneurs start off with a dream. The reason we’re still talking about Walker’s is her prescience, and her success in the span of just a dozen years. In pumping her “Wonderful Hair Grower” door-to-door, at churches and club gatherings, then through a mail-order catalog, Walker proved to be a marketing magician, and she sold her customers more than mere hair products. She offered them a lifestyle, a concept of total hygiene and beauty that in her mind would bolster them with pride for advancement.

To get the word out, Walker also was masterful in leveraging the power of America’s burgeoning independent black newspapers (in some cases, her ads kept them afloat). It was hard to miss Madam Walker whenever reading up on the latest news, and in her placements, she was a pioneer at using black women — actually, herself — as the faces in both her beforeand after shots, when others had typically reserved the latter for white women only (That was the dream, wasn’t it? the photos implied).

Contribute here to help us keep her legacy alive.

At the same time, Walker had the foresight to incorporate in 1910, and even when she couldn’t attract big-name backers, she invested $10,000 of her own money, making herself sole shareholder of the new Walker Manufacturing Company, headquartered at a state-of-the-art factory and school in Indianapolis, itself a major distribution hub.

Perhaps most important, Madam Walker transformed her customers into evangelical agents, who, for a handsome commission, multiplied her ability to reach new markets while providing them with avenues up out of poverty, much like Turnbo had provided her. In short order, Walker’s company had trained some 40,000 “Walker Agents” at an ever-expanding number of hair-culture colleges she founded or set up through already established black institutions. And there was a whole “Walker System” for them to learn, from vegetable shampoos to cold creams, witch hazel, diets and those controversial hot combs.

Contrary to legend, Madam Walker didn’t invent the hot comb. According to A’Lelia Bundles’ biography of Walker in Black Women in America, a Frenchman, Marcel Grateau, popularized it in Europe in the 1870s, and even Sears and Bloomingdale’s advertised the hair-straightening styling tool in their catalogs in the 1880s. But Walker did improve the hot comb with wider teeth, and as a result of its popularity, sales sizzled.

Careful to position herself as a “hair culturalist,” Walker was building a vast social network of consumer-agents united by their dreams of looking — and thus feeling — different, from the heartland of America to the Caribbean and parts of Central America. Whether it stimulated emulation or empowerment was the debate — and in many ways it still is. One thing, though, was for sure: It was big business. No — huge! “Open your own shop; secure prosperity and freedom,” one of Madam Walker’s brochures announced. Those who enrolled in “Lelia College” even received a diploma.

If imitation is the highest form of flattery, Walker had the Mona Lisa of black-beauty brands. Among the most ridiculous knockoffs was the white-owned “Madam Mamie Hightower” company. To keep others at bay, Walker insisted on placing a special seal with her likeness on every package. So successful, so quickly, was Walker in solidifying her presence in the consumer’s mind that when her marriage to C.J. fell apart in 1912, she insisted on keeping his name. After all, she’d already made it more famous.

To keep her agents more loyal, Walker organized them into a national association and offered cash incentives to those who promoted her values. In the same way, she organized the National Negro Cosmetics Manufacturers Association in 1917. “I am not merely satisfied in making money for myself,” Walker said in 1914. “I am endeavoring to provide employment for hundreds of women of my race.” And for her it wasn’t just about pay; Walker wanted to train her fellow black women to be refined. As she explained in her 1915 manual, Hints to Agents, “Open your windows — air it well … Keep your teeth clean in order that [your] breath might be sweet … See that your fingernails are kept clean, as that is a mark of refinement.”

Contribute here to help us keep her legacy alive.

Reading this, I instantly thought of Booker T. Washington, “the wizard of Tuskegee,” who, while troubled by the black beauty industry, shared Walker’s obsession with cleanliness. In fact, Washington made it critical to his school’s curriculum, preaching “the gospel of the toothbrush,” writes Suellen Hoy in her interesting history, Chasing Dirt: The American Pursuit of Cleanliness. “I never see … an unpainted or unwhitewashed house that I do not want to paint or whitewash it,” Washington himself wrote in his memoir, Up From Slavery.

I have no doubt this topic would’ve made for interesting conversation between Washington and Walker (after all, having come from similar places, weren’t they after similar things with not dissimilar risks?). Yet, try as Walker did to curry Washington’s favor, her initial forays only met his grudging acknowledgment, even though many of the wives Washington knew, including his own — the wives of the very ministers denouncing products like Walker’s — were dreaming of the same straight styles.

Read more of this blog post on The Root.

Who Was Bridgett “Biddy” Mason? – Day 1 of Black History Month 

​From Slave To Freedom

Bridget “Biddy” Mason, born a slave in Mississippi in 1818, achieved financial success that enabled her to support her extended family for generations despite the fact that she was illiterate. In a landmark case she sued her master for their freedom, saved her earnings, invested in real estate, and became a well-known philanthropist in Los Angeles, California. 

Although born in Mississippi, Mason was owned by slaveholders in Georgia and South Carolina before she was returned to Mississippi.  Her last owner, Robert Marion Smith, a Mississippi Mormon convert, followed the call of church leaders to settle in the West.  Mason and her children joined other slaves on Smith’s religious pilgrimage to establish a new Mormon community in what would become Salt Lake City, Utah.  At the time Utah was still part of Mexico

In 1848 30-year-old Mason walked 1,700 miles behind a 300-wagon caravan that eventually arrived in the Holladay-Cottonwood area of the Salt Lake Valley. Along the route west Mason’s responsibilities included setting up and breaking camp, cooking the meals, herding the cattle, and serving as a midwife as well as taking care of her three young daughters aged ten, four, and an infant.

Contribute here to help us keep her  legacy alive

In 1851 Smith and his family and slaves set out in a 150-wagon caravan for San Bernardino, California to establish yet another Mormon community. Ignoring Brigham Young’s warning that slavery was illegal in California, Smith brought Mason and other enslaved people to the new community.  Along the trek Mason met Charles H. and Elizabeth Flake Rowan, free blacks, who urged her to legally contest her slave status once she reached California, a free state.  Mason received additional encouragement by free black friends whom she met in California, Robert and Minnie Owens.

In December 1855 Robert Smith, fearing losing his slaves, decided to move with them to Texas, a slave state. The Owens family had a vested interest in the Mason family as one of their sons was romantically involved with Mason’s 17-year-old daughter.  When Robert Owens told the Los Angeles County Sheriff that slaves were being illegally held, he gathered a posse which including Owens and his sons, other cowboys and vaqueros from the Owens ranch.  The posse apprehended Smith’s wagon train in Cajon Pass, California en route to Texas and prevented him from leaving the state.

Contribute here to help us keep her legacy alive
After spending five years enslaved in a “free” state Bridget Mason challenged Robert Smith for her freedom.  On January 19, 1856 she petitioned the court for freedom for herself and her extended family of 13 women and children. Los Angeles District Judge Benjamin Hayes took three days before handing down his ruling in favor Mason and her extended family, citing California’s 1850 constitution which prohibited slavery. 

Mason and her family moved to Los Angeles where her daughter married the son of Robert and Minnie Owens.  Mason worked as midwife and nurse, saved her money and purchased land in the heart of what is now downtown Los Angeles. Mason also organized First A.M.E. Church, the oldest African American church in the city.  She educated her children and with her wealth became a philanthropist to the entire Los Angeles community.  Bridget “Biddy” Mason died in Los Angeles in 1891.

Sources:
Tricia Martineau Wagner, African American Women of the Old West (Guilford, Connecticut: TwoDot, an imprint of The Globe Pequot Press, 2007); Quintard Taylor, In Search of the Racial Frontier African Americans in the American West 1528-1990 (New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1998; Dolores Hayden, The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History (Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 1995); Jessie Carney Smith, (editor). Epic Lives One Hundred Black Women Who Made a Difference (Detroit: Visible Ink Press, 1993).

Contributor:

Independent Historian

– See more at: http://www.blackpast.org/aaw/mason-bridget-biddy-1818-1891#sthash.y9e7L7e2.dpuf

Maternal Health and The 3rd Day of Kwanzaa. Ujima means Collective Responsibility…

As I woke up this morning at 3:33 am CST, I could hear my children doing their traditional shuffles. They were preparing to come and creep into the bed, with my husband and I. So as I prepared to tell them, “Go back to sleep”… I am wide-eyed checking my Facebook timeline. I scroll down, I see a friend had posted something about a domestic violence video, of a woman beating her boyfriend up for cheating.

Another post of a birth worker that just witnessed a new baby into the fold of humanity. 

Lastly I came to the post of one of my good friends Nicole Deggins of Sista Midwife Productions. 

She is celebrating  (5 years) of service to training women in the community as Birth Sista’s/Doulas in her signature program this month. I am so proud of her. 

Today being the 3rd Day of Kwanzaa which is Ujima, means collective responsibility. I am proud to be in relationship and position, to be working with such spirited women. There is a legacy to be told and a powerful level of commitment to birth such projects. Along with deep focus on collective responsibility, this day follows a key principal:

The third principle of the Nguzo Saba is a commitment to active and informed togetherness on a subject of common interest.


So my question is: How can we not identify with the princiles of the Nguzo Saba to begin building programs worth a collective commitment? 

In this quote below, I took from the article that Nicole shared, sparked my whole reason for writing this “first wake” post.  

Despite spending two and half times more per person on health than the OECD average, the maternal mortality rate in the U.S. – the number of women who die during or as a result of childbirth and pregnancy – increased from 12 to 14 deaths per 100,000 live births from 1990 to 2015, putting the United States at 46th in the world. 


To me this is an long realized going off. A siren sounding. A gong… That we need to get to adhere to and get to work. As a social entrepreneur, birth woker, and future community developer, I have learned more about how the world works, being a mother than anything else. 

Motherhood has made me extremely passionate about creating synergistic balances, within the advancement community culture, reproductive health, and child wellness. This article spoke to me this morning and I hope that it speaks to you. That you may feel inclined to be a part of the solution for multigenerational health outcomes. Thus knowing that it all begins with how we are born. 

Til next time… I’m about to snuggle back into bed, with my husband and our youngest boy. Nothing like taking advantage of the power of a “second sleep.”

Happy Kwanzaa!!!

P.S. Check out the rest of the article below. There is a live feed from the event too. I’m gonna check it later. Leave a comment about what you think and how it relates to the 3rd Principle Of Kwanzaa Ujima.

Habari gani!!!

See more at: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/what-explains-the-united-states-dismal-maternal-mortality-rates#sthash.nKbGvpDx.dpuf?platform=hootsuite

Why We Shop At ALDI… Letting Go of Label Whoring…

 

So when I thought about writing this quick blog post, I wanted to propose a challenge. To release the oppression of label whoring. Particularly where our food is concerned. Let’s face it… I love the underdog… I am no stranger to the road less traveled. I guess this is why I have become accustomed to not being attracted to labels, as much as I am attracted, to what makes me feel good. Yet often times we get in the bed with these highly visibly branded corporations and don’t know who we are really sleeping with. Like a bad relationship, we stay with them, with the idea that we don’t have other options.

Well I’m here to tell you that it is time to get out of the bed, with the deceptive intelligence of major household brands.

I am not just advocating as a consumer, but as a mother with 3 children… A mother who has been on food stamps… A mother with children who are sensitive to synthetic color dyes (Well most children and and adults are they just don’t know the overarching symptoms of chemical intolerance)… The truth is most of the time, we just go with the flow because, it is easier than meeting resistance. Or being labeled as a person who is poor and unable to afford “major named brand products.”

It wasn’t until one of my good girl friends took me grocery shopping at ALDI. As an adult on public assistance, I was not ashamed… Yet I did not want to relive my childhood either. I was no stranger to being from a family who experienced economic hardship. It wasn’t until that day, I realized the shame I had as a little girl… The exact thing that made me see the benefits of struggling. At the time, my husband and I did not have a car, we had small children, and we were struggling entrepreneurs. No matter how little the pay or frustrating the experience, we learned the value of having more options, even when it appeared we had less.

Just for today, I want to show you two things I have learned, in just one purchase, in this blog post. With the latest GOOD NEWS of Aldi’s commitment to better quality ingredients at a economical price, I am extremely excited to share this with you.

#1 How much we can save when we explore ALL of our options?

#2 How spending more for name brands can be misleading regarding better quality.

Seeing Is Believing.

In these 5 images I want you the reader to observe the ingredients in the products first. Then to see how much you spend on a simple box of breakfast cereal at ALDI compared to Walmart. Last I want you to simply observe your wallet and determine how much you would save on the purchase between Fruit Rounds vs. Froot Loops.

 

In conclusion of this observation, I want you to comment and share this tid bit of information with your tribe. Remember this post is NOT about shaming… This post IS about building awareness…

***NOTE This is an image of a personal purchase that I made last week. 

Fruit Rounds Ingredients

Fruit Rounds Ingredients

Fruit Rounds

Fruit Rounds Cereal

The Price Of Fruit Rounds at Aldi

The Price Of Fruit Rounds at ALDI



Froot Loops

The Price of Froot Loops at Walmart

The Price of Froot Loops at Walmart

 

If you are anything like me… A saving of $2.80 means two more boxes of cereal… 

#BLABThat as a part of our #Homebirth2Homeschool platform we are sold on the power of child centered investment. It is safe to say that we are a PBS kind of family…

For us… This begins with acknowledging how well we identify, with the needs of our children, our tribe, our community, and then the world at large.

Conclusion

We are a 100% parent led organization, by a husband and wife team of grassroots social entrepreneurs. We strive to maintain a free thinking environment that supports our artistic passions and goals to build our social welfare organization. And because we do everything from home. (i.e.) Homebirth, homeschool, and even work-from-home online, we really value our family life. We enjoy traveling, performing arts, and quality time with our 3 sons. The fact that we are social entrepreneurs, we are focused on community building for a living. It is an experience that we aim to share with our core group of 3000 individuals across the globe. We dream in color and often remember the visions vividly. We set our intentions, these become our goals and we believe in our power to see them manifest. So stay connected to our website and let us know if we inspired you with any of our content… Also feel free to gift us with a colorful DONATION in support to keep our mission going.

 

 

TIMs 2016-2020 Oklahoma Mission

Oklahoma Moms Need Your Support

Black Pregnant Mom

It has been a long journey for many mothers here in the state of Oklahoma! Often times I wondered if our mission was taking root in the community as we shifted from place to place, city to city. Then one day I was given a divine message to pack light. Now I could have taken that several different ways. One way could have been to leave everything and follow my passion…

While the other could have meant to take my “light” with me wherever I go. I chose the second. Interpreting that light as my God and my guide. Now here I am, with my lovely Native born Oklahoman husband, and three male children. Watching them play and interact with one another as we go throughout our homeschool day. Managing our process and getting better everyday.

This might sound trivial and out of step of a business owner to post such transparencies.

… But it was transparencies that created this  mission you are reading on our website.

It was passion.

It was advocacy for whole family life.

It was about community.

And now that we are in the best place to “re-launch” our maternal health and wellness campaign that states our message loud, clear and unapologetically. We are 100% sure of our culture and how it relates to childbirth, and breastfeeding, and the disparities right here in the place, we hold residency. It is to no surprise that this is not just an issue here, but across the globe. That is why we need to garner the support of our fellow Oklahoman community to say once and for all… We care that one woman dies every minute during childbirth, yet almost all of these deaths are preventable. Here in the state of Oklahoma we have created a strategy to help reduce that number by 2020.

So What’s Up With TIM

When we began this journey into maternal and child health and wellness, we had only a birds eye view of how deep we would be guided into the community. We knew early on that we wanted to be an effective resource in the natural childbirth community, due to the various circumstances we had faced personally, and where we had been of service per our own expertise, which is in homebirth.

Now we have managed to create dynamic support systems and that offers us authentic relationships that many told us – we should not have privilege to because, we were not “alphabetically qualified.” Even though our experiences, and research, and self-apprenticed learning styles, didn’t measure up with privileged practices.

We are a grassroots social welfare organization with a mind to stand up to corporate and privatized organizations and companies that say the issues in the Black community are too much to resolve. Well this year we will finish with a bang because, we will not stop until we see a shift in the issues of crisis  within our urban and rural communities.

So we are taking deeper breaths.

We are creating broader relationships.

And we are doing it all on a dental floss budget.

Our Why…

One woman dies every minute during childbirth, yet almost all of these deaths are preventable. In 2001, the UN set itself the goal of slashing maternal mortality by 75% by 2015, but it is nowhere near meeting that target. “Surgery of any kind has risk,” and a C-section is, “still the riskiest way to have a baby. “In the US, almost one third of women have that procedure for delivery of their baby.”

 

The statistics on maternal mortality in America tell a shocking story when it comes to African-American women. They are three to four times more likely to die during childbirth than white American women. Dr Bill McCool says that even wealthy black American women have a higher rate of mortality during childbirth than wealthy white women.

Maternal mortality around the world

“People have looked at this from different angles. We know that African-American women tend to have higher blood pressure than the rest of the population, so is there a link there?”JoAnne Fischer, Executive Director of the Maternity Care Coalition, which works with low income women to help them stay healthy during their pregnancies, says: “We do know that there is extraordinary stress involved in racism and in being poor. “”And we know that sometimes this creates hypertension.” Hypertension, obesity and diabetes are all linked, so we have to make sure women start their pregnancies healthy.

“Dr Bill Callaghan, of the CDC, finds that not knowing why African-American women are at greater risk when giving birth has given him and his colleagues’ sleepless nights.” We can say that some of this may be due to socio-economic disparities. “But it does not explain all of it. “And to the extent that we don’t explain racial disparity in pregnancy-related mortality, we’re going to have difficulty making headway into it.” As doctors and US officials try to work out why American women are dying in childbirth, and what can be done to prevent it, Jim Scythes is still mourning his wife Valerie, who was all too briefly a mother.

To read more click here

Our Solution For Shifting The Rates In Oklahoma

In order for us to see a difference we need to shift the way we approach the childbirth community. Together using our history with #GivingTuesday global campaign we can make a big difference. Particularly in the African American community and others of color. The mindset regarding traditional childbirth has been diminished, with the practice of new wave technology and expensive research campaigns that warrant no solution. These outcomes are not because women want to die or want their children to die. These outcomes are from a deep rooted seed in the neurological DNA of generations of post traumatic stress as it relates to the Black community and slavery.

This type of cognitive dissonance is the paramount to our childbearing community.  It is our goal to build a committee or coalition of nonprofits, small businesses, and other community leaders to organize a #GivingTuesday movement in materno-toxic areas in the city and surrounding areas. There has been an assault on the womb of all women. This is at a very social and scientific disadvantage. In the state of Oklahoma, there is a core network of privileged, white led childbirth organizations that have not been able to penetrate the community of color. This adversity adds no value to the economic, social, and health care advantages that impacts the way women are giving birth. These include language and cultural barriers. This makes it extremely difficult to make clear and directed moves to support the agenda of the Maternal Mortality Review and Office of Minority Health in the state of Oklahoma.

It is every man’s obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it.”  – Albert Einstein

This is where our program offers a solution because, we have all taken the same route of creation. It is our obligation to put back into the world the equivalence of the best birth outcomes in communities that need it the most. So buy aligning with these organizations and offering women and men of color culturally competent, safe, evidence based education to support their community in childbirth, as certified birth work consultants, educators, and practitioners. Our networks of culturally centered organizations are ready and prepared to be added to our 2016 training calendar to add diversity to the childbirth community. You can help us make this possible in a variety of ways. First we have to determine why you should get involved.

WHY GET INVOLVED…

Purpose: To sensitize the community to the myriad problems that the childbirth community faces in the state of Oklahoma and the world today and motivate them to embrace a Cause that is meaningful to them.
Objectives: To discuss the basic necessities of life, or what is needed to be a part of a safe,
secure, and strong community.

To raise awareness about the most pressing issues, problems and concerns facing people around the globe – and at home regarding childbirth.

Running Question: WHAT IS THE PRIVILEDGE?

Investigate the idea of “privilege” in order to raise awareness about the way other populations DO and DO NOT experience privilege in our diverse communities. By having an elicit conversation about privilege we can get to the root of the cause, thus formulating a strategy to shift the image of disparity in childbirth, with RADICAL Change!

WHEN TO TAKE ACTION

In order to be effective we must take action now. That means to embrace the cause and start raising awareness and mobilize a core collective who is charged to make a difference.

Conclusion

We are a 100% parent led organization, by a husband and wife team of grassroots social entrepreneurs. We strive to maintain a free thinking environment that supports our artistic passions and goals to build our social welfare organization, The InTune Mother, LLC. And because we do everything from home. (i.e.) Home-birth, Home-school, and even work-from-home online, we really value our family life. We enjoy traveling, performing arts, and quality time with our 3 sons. The fact that we network for a living, is an experience that we aim to share with our core group of 3000 individuals across the globe. We dream in color and often remember the visions vividly. We set our intentions, these become our goals and we believe in our power to see them manifest. So stay connected to our website and let us know if we inspired you with any of our content… Also feel free to gift us with a colorful DONATION in support to keep our site going because we are…

Rebirthing Mother Nature’s Undisturbed Intent…

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