Who Was Francis Cress Welsing? – Day 5 of Black History Month 

 

Dr. Frances Cress Welsing: Looking Back at Her Call to Uproot Racism

Dr. Frances Cress Welsing: Looking Back at Her Call to Uproot Racism

[OP-ED] The controversial psychiatrist’s works unwaveringly challenged White supremacist thought even if it meant making some uncomfortable.

by Gregory Carr, Ph.D, January 5, 2016

For those unfamiliar with the name Dr. Frances Cress Welsing, who passed away at the age of 80 in Washington D.C., she was one our country’s most influential and controversial theoreticians on the subject of race and racism. Her influence did not stem from citations in academic journals, although she gained major recognition after publishing her groundbreaking 1970 essay, “Cress Theory of Color Confrontation (White Supremacy),” which began as a paper presented before members of the American Psychological Association.

Her analysis of the impact of White supremacy was trenchant, hard-hitting and consistent.  But like other scholars and “activists” in the Black community who knew Welsing and studied her work, I saw her as an unswerving champion for African Americans and lover of humanity.

Born in Chicago to a physician and an educator, Welsing was trained in the liberal arts at Antioch College and in medicine at Howard University College of Medicine, where she would eventually serve as faculty. A long-standing private practitioner and pioneer in the fields of child psychiatry and mental health, her longest institutional affiliation was as the Clinical Director and Staff Physician with the Washington D.C. Department of Human Services, where she charted policy and strategies to help emotionally disturbed children at the Hillcrest Children’s Center and the Paul Robeson School for Growth and Development.

Welsing’s work on improving the mental health of African Americans led to a career in the field of race and cultural analysis. The Cress Theory was influenced by the ideas of a Washington, DC acquaintance named Neely Fuller, Jr., and explored the thesis that racism, aggression and hostility stems from White fear of genetic annihilation in an overwhelmingly non-White world.  Fuller and Welsing contended that all of modern global relations were affected by White supremacist ideology and symbology, which they further grouped into nine categories of human activity: economics, education, entertainment, labor, law, politics, religion, sex and war.

She initiated the development for two generations of popular discourse in Black communities on the concept and reality of White supremacy, a status confirmed by her 1991 book The Isis Papers: Keys to the Colors, which was a collection of essays she had written over the previous two decades. It became a perennial non-fiction best seller in Black communities. Her 1974 debate with the Stanford Nobel Laureate, Dr. William Shockley —a proponent of the idea of Black intellectual inferiority—brought her to national attention. One of two articles she wrote for EBONY that year encouraged Black people to “get very quiet and calm and begin to think critically and analytically in a very broad perspective and cease doing push-button reactions to social events that happen around us and that relate negatively to us.”

In fact, this was Welsing’s consistent call— for Black people to take themselves seriously enough to analyze the system in which they lived and its impact on their lives. She contended that systems, rather than episodic challenges, marked the power of White supremacy over its victims.  She came of age in the shadow of Jim Crow; began her professional life during the Black Power era; saw prominence during the post-Civil Rights ideological debates of the 1970s and 80s, and re-ignited new generations searching for direction during the “golden age” of hip hop and the subsequent fracturing and turn of our “post-soul” era.  In some ways, her life and work traces the struggle over self and group identity that Black Americans have been embroiled in since the end of legal segregation. She often said that her intellectual guide was W.E.B. Du Bois who accurately observed that the problem of the modern era would be the global problem of the color line and the reaction of non-Whites to it.

The life and labor of Frances Cress Welsing is just one barometer of the gulf that remains between White and non-White public spheres in a society willfully blind to its inability to engage in “honest dialogues on race.” She weaponized her theories with an agenda that most people are afraid to discuss openly and honestly in polite company. She proposed that Black people avoid marriage until age 35 or older because we are not mature enough to raise children to survive and thrive in a White supremacist system. She said Black people should educate their own children and combine their resources to support Black institutions as a first order of business.

The dimensions of her work that critique Whiteness and its cultural impact fit comfortably today within the larger range of what are now called “Whiteness studies” and even elements of “Critical Race Theory.”  Even the casual reader of the work of academics and writers like David Roediger, Joe Feagin, Harriet Washington or Peggy McIntosh would find Welsing is not alone in her interrogation of the intersections of race, class, gender, biology and power.

But, unfortunately, I don’t believe she will be remembered along with those names.

Much of the controversy around Welsing’s ideas on the topic of race comes from an ignorance of the full range of her actual words and ideas. Many of her critics never met her or read little to none of her work. Some of the more informed criticisms mistake her focus on the roots of White supremacist as a belief in and/or call for “Black Supremacy.”  That critique forms around her discussion of the biological and social function of melanin, which she consistently said was an object of desire and envy of Whites.  Then there were her ideas on sex, primarily her assertion that the gender politics of White patriarchy had promoted homosexuality in Black communities as an attack on the growth and viability of Black families. For Welsing, race, class and gender issues in Black communities traced their roots to the corrosive systemic impact of White Supremacy, at the core of which was patriarchy.

As the life and legacy of Frances Cress Welsing continues to be celebrated and debated, there is no doubt that in the 21st century racism remains an intractable enemy of humanity. In a modern world shaped in the image of Europe and Europeans, no non-White group wants to be, in the language used by Duke University professor and cultural anthropologist, J. Lorand Matory, PhD in “last place.”  Ending racism has never been a matter of polite discourse or easy solutions. People will not agree and paths of most resistance will involve fighting with one another. It appears then that the systemic work of racial oppression will continue, unimpeded, until all people of good will determine that it can only end with our collective active participation. Wouldn’t that then be a fitting tribute to an intellectual warrior like Dr. Frances Cress Welsing.

Gregory Carr, Ph.D. is Associate Professor and Chair of Howard University’s Department of Afro American Studies

Read more at EBONY http://www.ebony.com/news-views/dr-frances-cress-welsing-looking-back-at-her-call-to-uproot-racism-333#ixzz4XruZvfhT 

Who Was Shirley Chisholm? Day 4 of Black History Month

UNBOUGHT & UNBOSSED

12 Facts About Shirley Chisholm, The First African-American to Run For President

Being the first black woman to serve on Congress would be a significant enough accomplishment for a lifetime, but it wasn’t good enough for Shirley Chisholm. Three years after she arrived in Washington, D.C., Chisholm became the first woman to run for president for the Democratic party. When announcing her intention to seek the nomination in 1972, she stated, “I’m a revolutionary at heart now and I’ve got to run, even though it might be the downfall of my career.” Though her campaign was controversial at times, it wasn’t the downfall of her long and noteworthy career. Here are a few things to know about this bold educator-turned-politician.

1. SHE HAD INTERNATIONAL ROOTS

On November 30, 1924, Shirley Anita St. Hill was born in Brooklyn, New York to Ruby Seale and Charles St. Hill. Her mother was a domestic worker who immigrated to the U.S. from Barbados; her father, a factory worker, was originally from Guyana.Being the first black woman to serve on Congress would be a significant enough accomplishment for a lifetime, but it wasn’t good enough for Shirley Chisholm. Three years after she arrived in Washington, D.C., Chisholm became the first woman to run for president for the Democratic party. When announcing her intention to seek the nomination in 1972, she stated, “I’m a revolutionary at heart now and I’ve got to run, even though it might be the downfall of my career.” Though her campaign was controversial at times, it wasn’t the downfall of her long and noteworthy career. Here are a few things to know about this bold educator-turned-politician.

2. SHE WAS BORN IN BROOKLYN, BUT SHE DIDN’T HAVE A NEW YORK ACCENT.

In 1928, Chisholm and her two sisters were sent to live with their grandmother in Barbados, while her parents stayed in New York and worked through the Great Depression. Chisholm attended a one-room schoolhouse on this island in the West Indies. In addition to receiving a British education, she picked up an accent, which remained slight but noticeable throughout her life.

3. EDUCATION HAD A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON HER LIFE …

Chisholm returned to the U.S. in March 1934 at age 9 and resumed with a public-school education. Following high school, she studied sociology at Brooklyn College and earned her BA in 1946. (She was a prize-winning debater in college, a skill that would serve her well throughout her political career.) She continued her education at Columbia University and earned an MA in early childhood education in 1952. While she was still a student at Columbia, she began teaching at a nursery school and married Conrad Chisholm in 1949. They would later divorce in 1977.

4. … SO MUCH SO THAT SHE BEGAN HER PROFESSIONAL CAREER IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION.

Library of Congress

After working at the nursery school, Chisholm worked her way through the teaching ranks and by 1953 was the director of two day care centers, a position she held until 1959. Her expertise and experience led to her role as an educational consultant for New York City’s Division of Day Care from 1959 through 1964.

5. HER POLITICAL CAREER—WHICH STARTED AT THE NEW YORK STATE LEGISLATURE—WAS REVOLUTIONARY FROM THE BEGINNING.

Chisholm was a member of the League of Women Voters and the Bedford-Stuyvesant Political League before she ran for the New York State Assembly in 1964. When she won, Chisholm became the second African-American woman to serve on the state legislature. From 1965 to 1968, Chisholm served as a Democratic member and focused on unemployment benefits for domestic workers and education initiatives.

6. REDISTRICTING INSPIRED HER RUN FOR CONGRESS.

Chisholm set her sights on Congress when redistricting efforts gave Brooklyn a new congressional district. Not one to shy away from the public, Chisholm used to drive through neighborhoods while announcing, “This is fighting Shirley Chisholm coming through.” She defeated three candidates in the primary election, including a state senator, before defeating well-known civil rights activist James Farmer in the general election. This victory made her the first African-American woman elected to Congress, and she would go on to serve seven terms.

Political buttons from the collection of Alix Kates Shulman. Image credit: Polly Shulman.”

 7. SHE HAD A WAY WITH WORDS AND ESTABLISHED HERSELF AS OUTSPOKEN AND READY FOR CHANGE EARLY IN HER FIRST TERM.

She was known for her bold declarations. After her upset victory in the congressional election, she boasted, “Just wait, there may be some fireworks.” And she delivered on that promise. Given her campaign slogan “Unbought and unbossed,” it should come as no surprise that Chisholm quickly made her presence known in Congress. She spoke out against the Vietnam War within the first few months of her arrival and said she would vote against military spending. When she was initially relegated to the House Agricultural Committee, she requested a new assignment, claiming that she didn’t think she could best serve her Brooklyn constituents from that position.

 

After directly addressing House Speaker John McCormack on the matter, she was reassigned to Veterans’ Affairs, and then moved to the Education and Labor Committee in 1971. True to her desire to bring about change, Chisholm hired all women for her office, half of whom were African-American. She was also a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus as well as the National Women’s Political Caucus.

Chisholm with Rosa Parks (L) between 1960 and 1970. Image Credit: Library of Congress

8. HER PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN WAS UNEXPECTED AND HISTORIC.

Chisholm formally announced her intention to seek the Democratic presidential nomination in January 1972, making her the first African-American to run for a major party and the first woman to vie for the Democratic nomination. During her speech, which she delivered in her hometown of Brooklyn, Chisholm said, “I am not the candidate of black America, although I am black and proud. I am not the candidate of the women’s movement of this country, although I am a woman and I am equally proud of that…I am the candidate of the people of America, and my presence before you now symbolizes a new era in American political history.”

Although her campaign wasn’t as well-funded as her competitors’, Chisholm did get her name on the primary ballot in 12 states and won 28 delegates in primary elections. She received about 152 delegates at the Democratic National Convention, coming in fourth place for the party.

9. THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL WAS FULL OF CHALLENGES.

Chisholm likely expected challenges during her campaign, and she certainly encountered a fair amount. She received multiple threats against her life, including assassination attempts, and was granted Secret Service protection to ensure her safety. Chisholm also had to sue to be included in televised debates.

There was even controversy where there could have been encouragement. Her decision to run for the Democratic nomination caught many members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) off-guard, and they weren’t happy that she acted before a formal and unified decision could be made. But Chisholm was done with waiting; when the subject of the CBC came up on the night she announced her campaign, she told the crowd, “While they’re rapping and snapping, I’m mapping.”

10. SHE HAD AN UNLIKELY SUPPORTER IN GEORGE WALLACE.

Chisholm was well aware that her biggest source of support came from women and minorities and often advocated on their behalf, so it shocked many of her supporters and constituents when she visited political rival George Wallace after an assassination attempt sent him to the hospital—and ultimately left him paralyzed—in 1972. Wallace, who was governor of Alabama, was known for his racist comments and segregationist views, but Chisholm checked on him. She said she never wanted what happened to him to happen to anybody else.

Ultimately, their friendship benefited the public when Wallace came through for Chisholm on an important piece of legislation in 1974. She was working on a bill that would give domestic workers the right to a minimum wage. Wallace convinced enough of his fellow Southern congressmen to vote in favor of the bill, moving it through the House.

11. FOLLOWING RETIREMENT, CHISHOLM DIDN’T SLOW DOWN.

Chisholm retired from Congress in 1982, but leaving the political arena didn’t mean she was done making a difference. Although she planned on spending more time with her second husband, Arthur Hardwick Jr., she also returned to teaching at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts and continued to speak at colleges across the country.

Chisholm passed away on January 1, 2005 at age 80 in Ormond Beach, Florida. She is buried in Buffalo, New York, and the inscription on the mausoleum vault in which she is buried reads “Unbought and Unbossed.”

12. SHE CONTINUES TO GARNER ACCOLADES FOR HER TRAILBLAZING WORK.

Chisholm was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1993. In 2014, the U.S. Postal Service debuted the Shirley Chisholm Forever Stamp as part of the Black Heritage Series. A year later, President Barack Obama posthumously awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and there is talk of a movie being made about her life. But Chisholm never doubted what legacy she wanted to leave behind, once saying, “I want history to remember me…not as the first black woman to have made a bid for the presidency of the United States, but as a black woman who lived in the 20th century and who dared to be herself. I want to be remembered as a catalyst for change in America.”

 

ARTICLE RETRIEVED FROM: m.mentalfloss.com/article

TIMs 2016-2020 Oklahoma Mission

Oklahoma Moms Need Your Support

Black Pregnant Mom

It has been a long journey for many mothers here in the state of Oklahoma! Often times I wondered if our mission was taking root in the community as we shifted from place to place, city to city. Then one day I was given a divine message to pack light. Now I could have taken that several different ways. One way could have been to leave everything and follow my passion…

While the other could have meant to take my “light” with me wherever I go. I chose the second. Interpreting that light as my God and my guide. Now here I am, with my lovely Native born Oklahoman husband, and three male children. Watching them play and interact with one another as we go throughout our homeschool day. Managing our process and getting better everyday.

This might sound trivial and out of step of a business owner to post such transparencies.

… But it was transparencies that created this  mission you are reading on our website.

It was passion.

It was advocacy for whole family life.

It was about community.

And now that we are in the best place to “re-launch” our maternal health and wellness campaign that states our message loud, clear and unapologetically. We are 100% sure of our culture and how it relates to childbirth, and breastfeeding, and the disparities right here in the place, we hold residency. It is to no surprise that this is not just an issue here, but across the globe. That is why we need to garner the support of our fellow Oklahoman community to say once and for all… We care that one woman dies every minute during childbirth, yet almost all of these deaths are preventable. Here in the state of Oklahoma we have created a strategy to help reduce that number by 2020.

So What’s Up With TIM

When we began this journey into maternal and child health and wellness, we had only a birds eye view of how deep we would be guided into the community. We knew early on that we wanted to be an effective resource in the natural childbirth community, due to the various circumstances we had faced personally, and where we had been of service per our own expertise, which is in homebirth.

Now we have managed to create dynamic support systems and that offers us authentic relationships that many told us – we should not have privilege to because, we were not “alphabetically qualified.” Even though our experiences, and research, and self-apprenticed learning styles, didn’t measure up with privileged practices.

We are a grassroots social welfare organization with a mind to stand up to corporate and privatized organizations and companies that say the issues in the Black community are too much to resolve. Well this year we will finish with a bang because, we will not stop until we see a shift in the issues of crisis  within our urban and rural communities.

So we are taking deeper breaths.

We are creating broader relationships.

And we are doing it all on a dental floss budget.

Our Why…

One woman dies every minute during childbirth, yet almost all of these deaths are preventable. In 2001, the UN set itself the goal of slashing maternal mortality by 75% by 2015, but it is nowhere near meeting that target. “Surgery of any kind has risk,” and a C-section is, “still the riskiest way to have a baby. “In the US, almost one third of women have that procedure for delivery of their baby.”

 

The statistics on maternal mortality in America tell a shocking story when it comes to African-American women. They are three to four times more likely to die during childbirth than white American women. Dr Bill McCool says that even wealthy black American women have a higher rate of mortality during childbirth than wealthy white women.

Maternal mortality around the world

“People have looked at this from different angles. We know that African-American women tend to have higher blood pressure than the rest of the population, so is there a link there?”JoAnne Fischer, Executive Director of the Maternity Care Coalition, which works with low income women to help them stay healthy during their pregnancies, says: “We do know that there is extraordinary stress involved in racism and in being poor. “”And we know that sometimes this creates hypertension.” Hypertension, obesity and diabetes are all linked, so we have to make sure women start their pregnancies healthy.

“Dr Bill Callaghan, of the CDC, finds that not knowing why African-American women are at greater risk when giving birth has given him and his colleagues’ sleepless nights.” We can say that some of this may be due to socio-economic disparities. “But it does not explain all of it. “And to the extent that we don’t explain racial disparity in pregnancy-related mortality, we’re going to have difficulty making headway into it.” As doctors and US officials try to work out why American women are dying in childbirth, and what can be done to prevent it, Jim Scythes is still mourning his wife Valerie, who was all too briefly a mother.

To read more click here

Our Solution For Shifting The Rates In Oklahoma

In order for us to see a difference we need to shift the way we approach the childbirth community. Together using our history with #GivingTuesday global campaign we can make a big difference. Particularly in the African American community and others of color. The mindset regarding traditional childbirth has been diminished, with the practice of new wave technology and expensive research campaigns that warrant no solution. These outcomes are not because women want to die or want their children to die. These outcomes are from a deep rooted seed in the neurological DNA of generations of post traumatic stress as it relates to the Black community and slavery.

This type of cognitive dissonance is the paramount to our childbearing community.  It is our goal to build a committee or coalition of nonprofits, small businesses, and other community leaders to organize a #GivingTuesday movement in materno-toxic areas in the city and surrounding areas. There has been an assault on the womb of all women. This is at a very social and scientific disadvantage. In the state of Oklahoma, there is a core network of privileged, white led childbirth organizations that have not been able to penetrate the community of color. This adversity adds no value to the economic, social, and health care advantages that impacts the way women are giving birth. These include language and cultural barriers. This makes it extremely difficult to make clear and directed moves to support the agenda of the Maternal Mortality Review and Office of Minority Health in the state of Oklahoma.

It is every man’s obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it.”  – Albert Einstein

This is where our program offers a solution because, we have all taken the same route of creation. It is our obligation to put back into the world the equivalence of the best birth outcomes in communities that need it the most. So buy aligning with these organizations and offering women and men of color culturally competent, safe, evidence based education to support their community in childbirth, as certified birth work consultants, educators, and practitioners. Our networks of culturally centered organizations are ready and prepared to be added to our 2016 training calendar to add diversity to the childbirth community. You can help us make this possible in a variety of ways. First we have to determine why you should get involved.

WHY GET INVOLVED…

Purpose: To sensitize the community to the myriad problems that the childbirth community faces in the state of Oklahoma and the world today and motivate them to embrace a Cause that is meaningful to them.
Objectives: To discuss the basic necessities of life, or what is needed to be a part of a safe,
secure, and strong community.

To raise awareness about the most pressing issues, problems and concerns facing people around the globe – and at home regarding childbirth.

Running Question: WHAT IS THE PRIVILEDGE?

Investigate the idea of “privilege” in order to raise awareness about the way other populations DO and DO NOT experience privilege in our diverse communities. By having an elicit conversation about privilege we can get to the root of the cause, thus formulating a strategy to shift the image of disparity in childbirth, with RADICAL Change!

WHEN TO TAKE ACTION

In order to be effective we must take action now. That means to embrace the cause and start raising awareness and mobilize a core collective who is charged to make a difference.

Conclusion

We are a 100% parent led organization, by a husband and wife team of grassroots social entrepreneurs. We strive to maintain a free thinking environment that supports our artistic passions and goals to build our social welfare organization, The InTune Mother, LLC. And because we do everything from home. (i.e.) Home-birth, Home-school, and even work-from-home online, we really value our family life. We enjoy traveling, performing arts, and quality time with our 3 sons. The fact that we network for a living, is an experience that we aim to share with our core group of 3000 individuals across the globe. We dream in color and often remember the visions vividly. We set our intentions, these become our goals and we believe in our power to see them manifest. So stay connected to our website and let us know if we inspired you with any of our content… Also feel free to gift us with a colorful DONATION in support to keep our site going because we are…

Rebirthing Mother Nature’s Undisturbed Intent…

Get Involved With TIM

Wake Up Wednesday ~ No Apologies For Saving Black Babies… We Are Saving Humanity

NEW SLAVES WITH OLD SLAVE MENTALITY

This day in time is full of information and propaganda. Right here and now it is so much critical information to move beyond, just living day to day. According to #KanyeWest we are NEW SLAVES — slaves to the poverty mindset is surly the blood on the leaves. After reading for the 4th time this week about another young Black male child dead before 25, I am heavy. We use to have milestones in the life-cycle of our youth… Now we just have news reporters and statistics. As the proud wife of a remarkable Black man, with whom I parent three Black male children, together we feel that we HAVE TO BE STRATEGIC, in teaching our children the way of the current world. When my oldest son who was five at the time of the Travon Martin case — now he is seven and watching the Mike Brown case he asked, “Why do they always kill Black people? He went on the ask, was it safe to be a Black person… and profess his fear of being a Black male. So I have been very careful in order to write this bog post, with love and gratitude for self and kind first. This post could not only be about a distressed childbirth community of a problematic population of Black people. This is about a problematic society of ancestral backlash and we have all been tragically affected by the forceful root of slavery and the birth of the Negro American in the new world.

So we thank you for staying committed to our posts as we sort through the divinity of our hearts, and the best way to approach the stories we have been reading in the latest articles around the Black population regarding women, their children, and the power of the urban community through the “wonder years”. I really want to be transparent here and touch on some issues regarding the BLACK community, maternal health, and infant death from a deeper prospective, without being offensive. This seriously has to go above and beyond providing a population of people with “proper” education about how to have babies, what to eat, what to wear, and what is appropriate maternal behavior. This is bigger than telling a mom what activities not to engage in that can obviously be harmful to herself or the unborn baby. What this is about is a shift in cultural competencies, and the lack of urgency, to give Love and respect for self and kind. This is about the importance of the Black mother and her contribution to population to the human civilization as a whole. Lastly what this is about is… a long legacy of poor, undermined, strategic approaches to the falter of Black community, and the Black mother has ALWAYS been the main target.

BREAKING THE MENTAL CHAINS AGAIN AND AGAIN

We as healthy childbirth advocates, human rights activists, artist, philanthropists, and educators come in all sorts of colors. Our goals to make the world a better place to live for everyone is our commonality in humanity. The sad thing is that (Black people) have to take such a strategic approach, when attempting to execute any negativity or problematic issues, within our dying community. So why is it when minority people take the empowerment approach it is identified as being racist and/or rebellious. But what makes it rebellious? Why it such and issue when people of color want better for their population? It is past time for taking responsibility to rebuild a positive infrastructure that establishes a collective neutrality between various communities, groups, and organizations. It is hard to do this without being met with opposition because, society thrives off of social classifications and the intellectually elite.

This is why the Black population has only 9 people in the whole USA that represents the Billionaires Club. The problem with this is that, with such a small number of world changers, we are still stretched out, bitter, and frustrated by those who don’t see the need to change the situation within the minority population. The underserved are critically judged, with large specks of dirt in the eyes of the majority. Many label them unjustly, while we continue holding on to signs that read, “No Justice, It’s JUST US.” But “just” means what?  Does it mean, if we begin to conduct our own resource network of services through financial institutions, healthcare, education, and politics? Does that mean we would see more reproductive, maternal, and  infant disparity gaps closed? Would we see more families living in harmony? Would we see more liberation within the guise of freedom? Just what if we stopped looking to government organizations and services to support the sustainability of our families? We have to be honest that if we did have a different economic profile, would we be willing to invest in our own sovereignty? Would we be in the same position because of the fearful and lacking mentality? But just what if something was actually created to spark the needed change of liberation and independence that broke the chains once and for all?

Human Welfare vs. Maternal Warfare

The uniqueness of the Black population and it’s influence on society is our own. The new-found culture, and how it’s leading many in various directions has it’s good points and not so good points. Those who assume the position as (oppressive theorists) has everyone all twisted up in one big noose. So we have to learn how to reconnect to our innate nature and remove ourselves from this NEW way of thinking about the OLD world. Simplicity rules the game… but these simplistic concepts are NOT being implemented within SOCIAL SOCIETY of community… Because we are being taught by people who do not have the proper cultural concepts around economics, civilization, childbearing, and family. Here lays the problem. There is an assumption that because Blacks are having such economic, social, maternal, and infant hardships, we are not intellectually savvy enough to change these dynamics. This is my take… Instead of attempting to correct cultural behavioral attitudes… Share the balance of understanding. Acknowledge that the theories used to assist in finding these statistics are the culprit. Think of the statistics that tell us that more Black men are gay or in prison than their White counterparts. Majority of these men that are incarcerated are there on faulty charges. Or that men of color – particularly Black men are poor fathers. What about the fact that more women of color have poor birth outcomes than any other population. Then we have the HIV/Aids statics. This is not coincidental. This is maternal warfare. Studies show that most new HIV infections among African American women (87%; 5,300) are attributed to heterosexual contact.

We would not have to dig too deep to see the social and economic profile that is being put on display for people of color. When the Black population begins to realize that our origin and new-found residence determines the whole existence of our current conditions… maybe then many will wake up. Black women are having trouble in childbirth because, epigenetically we are suffering from post-traumatic cultural stress. Our new culture is sensationalized by the economics of reality television, sexual mis-education in music, and poor financial investment choices. More stress comes from the woman’s inability to transcend with these times. This accounts for majority of her emotional trauma because, she does not know where she fits in with herself, her man, or her community, so she struggles with her place in manifesting life from within. This is also warfare.

When our original cultural practices were removed in the new land, our natural, socially intuitive concepts died, with our spiritual through religious indoctrination. It is past time to resurrect the culture of a strong economic movement to save Black women and children, through our own social concepts because, this is so not just about mortality rates… This is about reconnecting to the right mental profile and environment surrounding the “image” of the Black Family as a whole.

 

Sankofa Led Progression

There is a multitude of minority organizations making phenomenal strides, by educating and producing strong community connections in the population of color. The ICTC and The Birthing Project are just a couple. There are many others serving the population in “community development.” But every time I read a new article about the need of more Black people in the maternal health care rescue, I cringe. I cringe because, there are people doing the work, whether they are being publicly recognized for it or not. The idea of adding more Blacks to the profession of healthcare will ultimately shape the profile of the community of color. So it makes me ask, “How long are we going to have to keep rescuing Black people?” I cringe again because, there is a genocidal presence hovering over our community that highlights everything that we do in error and shortcomings, and not our triumphs. But the funny thing is that what is done in error, is learned behavior. We were taught to hate ourselves, to deny our own instincts, and to denounce native cultural practices. Yet when I see other proud organizations, led by the majority population, teaching their white counterparts, and a fraction of women of color, how to reconnect to the original spiritual concepts of childbirth, with their own organic ideologies, I can’t help but question, the purpose of the mission.

Next these organizations  go out and serve the “underserved” populations, with no authentic connection and this makes me feel displaced, because many minority owned grassroots organizations have small budgets to implement their services. Although sincere in their desires, it keeps the majority populations at the forefront of maternal education and the minority population somewhat invisible.

They are not as successful in our communities because, of rich cultural barriers. It is said, that we live in a diverse society, and maybe this is the problem. We are only diversified by race, ethnicity, and culture. Not to mention by what is in our bank accounts. When in essence of it all we are not oppressed by the color of or skin, but the interpretations of the mind and how we identify with one another based on the color of our skin. When Black people have to fight to prove their competence, their loyalty, their intellect, and their communal validity… this is a problem. When ALL people stop competing in this invisible race war, then we will fare over much better because, LOVE is the greatest historical principle that any population of people can research, and seek to find. With this we can find the same universal outcome. For love is where we will find Sankofa. This is the beginning of what we are ALL searching for. It is not hidden in a textbook, seminar, or lecture. It is deep within the principles of humanity and purpose as a whole. Life is full of abundance and there is no thing or person without access to this universal gift. We just have to remember that we have access to it and that access is through our children.

Make love and not war… The future of humanity depends on it…



“Abundance is not something we acquire. It is something we tune into.”

Wayne Dyer


The InTune Mother Is About Childbirth Empowerment

Here at The InTune Mother, we take on a holistic, spiritual, NON-MEDICAL approach to childbirth that empowers the mother and partner of the unborn baby from a communal stand point.

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Transitioning Through A Crisis

Maternal Health In The USA Fails The American Family

No matter how far we believe we have come, we have to identify with the issues at hand here in America, as it relates to maternal mortality and infant death. As I worked this weekend, drafting new content and a more positive branding structure for the TIM (The InTune Mother) website, I had an epiphany. We need to keep positive stories as it relates to maternal and infant health on the forefront. This is part of a beta test that we launched to show people how powerful the media is as it relates to how we feel about the mentioned subject. But I have to be real. Maternal and infant death is why we are here (on this website). We are driving awareness to this issue because, if we don’t confront these issues head on… Looking at the root of the problems… With a clear lens… Then we won’t find a viable solution. As I woke up this morning, with my husband at my feet, my youngest son at my breast, and my middle son snuggled on the edge of the bed, with his fluffy dog pillow, I was filled with tears of gratitude. There is something unique about my life. This is not to say that other families are not unique in their own way — I just see the beauty in being a part of the majority and not the minority, of those families who woke up feeling defeated and displaced. To the mother of a child who didn’t wake up this morning because, she passed after giving birth to her new baby.  Or the family grieving the loss of the much anticipated newcomer who was stillborn at 39 weeks. Lastly for the baby who didn’t make it to his/her first birthday because, the environment wasn’t conducive to a thriving family lifestyle. And this is a majority issue to a minority people, but it’s actually the opposite. This is a minority issue, to a majority people, and majority of these people are transitioning through a crisis. When this is taking place in the community, it makes the U.S. look like a third world developing country, NOT AMERICA. If you look at the diagram below you’ll see exactly what I mean. Maternal Mortality USA

Maternal Health Care Has Bad Karma In The US

When I got out of bed, I brushed my teeth and washed my face, I sat down in front of the computer to check my email and Facebook inbox for pertinent notifications… Only to find an article by the Huffington Post (read more here), and see what you see above this paragraph. It’s sad that the United States is number 7 out of 10 other countries and has a 1.7% increased in the rank of maternal mortality. This should not be a shocking thing. When you look at the lineup of how other countries are progressing, I can’t do anything, but be driven down into my spirit and insight about bad karma for the United States. I say this because, when you look at the other countries; Zimbabwe, Botswana, and Chad to name a few, you know these are heavily war ridden populations. And it bothers me that we would be in the running with these countries, who are not as developed,  and we (Americans) a thriving, technology driven country, are still poorly ranking, with these specific numbers in our diverse populations. This tells us something very very deep. It tells us… when we see places like Romania, Poland, and Albania even Morocco having decreased its maternal mortality rate, it tells us something very important… It tells us that we’re just placing our resources and cosmic energy in the wrong place. This universal energy is abundant and full of endless possibilities, including self preservation. It is no secret to the solution here. We know that education has always been the key to successful developments in time. Yet now misuse of this energy is showing its face and “Houston we have a big problem!” I won’t go into the history of our ancestors from South Africa, to West and East Africa, to the West Indies, and South America. I won’t go into those places within this blog post. But what I will say is that in order for us to see a solution and to break the karmic past of the United States, as it relates to this maternal mortality rate… Specifically within the African-American population we have to speak the truth.

There has to be a driving force here and it has to be filled, with deliberate and strategic ideas, around how to fix things.  I believe the way to creating this solution is sitting right in front of our faces. Don’t let this data get twisted up. There is probably going to be a higher spike in the numbers yet because, with better reporting and tracking applications, we will see a great difference. In hopes that the determining information is building bridges for more innovative strategies. For instance, by returning to nature, we allow fresh perspectives to be introduced to the public eye. But, when you have a society that refutes nature, and that talks against nature… and everything is so medical and scientific… We miss the ball. We miss the opportunity to eradicate these different types of disparities, within the culture of maternal health. This is about primary care for all, or better yet human rights (period). I study with Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and when you think about what Primary Healthcare For All means, it’s declaration is about preserving humanities well being, starting with proper health care. If anything, the care women receive here in the states is so shabby because, we don’t have the two very most dynamic pieces of the maternal puzzle working together. We have medical vs. political vs. humanity and then what we end up having is; different types of disparities that were unable to be maneuvered into a solid solution because, the minds are geared towards social experimentation, new technologies, new ways to utilize instruments (toys) versus following the mind of nature drawing off of the karma of what has always been… Or “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

The Mental Mentality Behind Maternal Health 

“Mind your matter” is the biggest message that we’ve always said to families that we service here at TIM.  One other finite perspective we pride ourselves in here at The InTune Mother Project  is that there is usually no physician in attendance to help you (mother/father) learn the act of lovemaking. It was a natural and consensual process 90% of the time.  Which in turn implanted that child into the womb of the mother… so why should there be the need of physician assistance to extract or remove a child from it’s mother’s womb, when there is no serious reason to do so.  In America right now, the cesarean rate is at 32.8%. When we look at this clearly, the maternal and infant death rate doubling and tripling in the populations here and abroad, what are we really arguing and debating over? Is it money or the idea of childbirth being a natural event versus a medical event? So then I’d say we’re causing ourselves more harm than good because, simply put, there is no solution that lives in the research money you spend on commonwealth education. Starting with effective ideas around what is being done right, instead of what certain populations lack or are in need of is the one way to be effective. Ever watched a cat give birth, or a dog, or any other animal in the wild? There’s no one there to interrupt the system or massage human, domesticated concepts into the life force energy of that well equipped creature. In itself and I’m humbly speaking that the more we identify with the problems from suggestive entities, lying down the ground rules inside the minds of those controlling “We The People,” then the populations mental faculties surrounding the natural and holistic body of successful health and wellness, will continue to see faltering in the human population.  I’m not sorry for seeking deliberate therapy and equally just access for those who know not.  There is nothing that can be done or that will be done, if we do not create programs that speak to the reality of these issues.  There will only be more disparities, more works toward balancing faulty mental energy, until we learn to go where the love is. Following and loving, piece by piece. This is found when humanity takes hold of the foundation of what we know we have, and that is a voice. There is an amazing quote by Jim Rohn that says,

“Effective communication is 20% what you know and 80% how you feel about what you know.”

The beauty of effective communication is 20% of what you know and is just your learned concept… and the other 80% of how you feel about what you know is based on how confident you are of what you learned to trust as true or false. Here is an example: You’re pregnant. 20% of this information you know as truth.. Whether you took a test at home or found out from your practitioner, you know that you’re pregnant. Now the real cookie here is about how you feel now that you know your pregnant. Do those same anxious thoughts come to mind that most women have? You plan to go to the hospital, They may play the money card and fill your head with this statement, ” You’re a small woman and most women your size have complicated deliveries”. And this is where we have to get a serious action plan.  These physicians actually tell these new moms things that spike stress levels and create hypertension, nor do they advise women of alternatives outside of prescriptions or nutritional value, for prenatal health, and they seldom work with Midwives & Doulas due to inferiority complexes in the male dominated field of obstetrics.

CONCLUSION

If these women do not have the right information as to who can help them give birth successfully, then I’m not so sure that traditional methods of childbirth will rise, with little or no support to their education. And giving them a very basic education is such a slap in the face. What should they have to learn you might ask? People need to be educated by people that look like them first! The more and more were able to educate people from a communal standpoint, the more we are able to identify with the problems at hand, and create valuable solutions. There is no way to look at every woman’s body as a one-stop shop or SRX-Model. These are human beings and we have to get out of that sick state of mind and broken mentality that everybody is created the same way. Yes! Every woman has a vagina, with her very own uniqueness about her vagina, it is actually her fingerprint in childbirth. No vagina is the same. Ask the men who sleep with random women and they’ll tell you that. There’s no identical aspects in relation to the promise that every woman’s pelvis is also unique, so we have to treat it that way. This simple idea has been oppressively used by those who prey on the weak, when they take away a woman’s right to identify with her own bodily forces.  They are obstructing her ability to charge forward, within her responsibility by convincing her that  letting go of her power is right and exact. This is almost as bad as rape and being taken advantage of because they are mentally stripping her of what she’s capable of doing innately by herself, and that is protecting herself and her young. So by telling her to resist herself, this is the reason why we’re losing so many women, and so many babies to Deadly Deliveries because, too many don’t want to see women giving birth the way that mother nature intended. To many want to disturb nature in every way that they can, to research, pick, and probe to get information that is unnecessary for human evolution. It’s so simple, Dr. Bradley speaks of this highly ~ If you just watch nature you’ll get the research, you’ll get the information, you’ll get your solutions. but then again, it all begins with the key component and that is the power of effective communication. When you have blockages in your communication, you’ll find disparities at every turn… Can you hear Mother Nature crying for her children?

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