A Black Carpet Community Brunch 

 

 

Mimosas 4 Moms

So we are only focused on mastering…

The Power of NOW!

We are a 100% parent led organization. Our primary goal is to find ways to keep other parents fully aware of all of their options pertaining to conception and childbirth. So we charged families to Birth Like A BOSS and began to strategize how they experienced childbirth. This is our why…

The BOSS Method Remix

As a Mother and Independent Perinatal Birth Consultant, I don’t expect change, I evoke change, with Father in mind, this power becomes we. This power becomes community.

Over the last few years, we became aware that not many childbirth organizations are led by minority women. So we found it necessary for us to “observe” this fact, and look for ways to employ some diversity, to the community of birth work. With the right setting and time, we can openly discuss how together we can heal the most traumatic racial disparities that affects the ecological footprint of the human family. When we appropriate our attention to the bigger problems then we find solutions. In the word “Sankofa” we must always remember to “reach back and get it.” This is our missing link to our success. In short, as modern day humans, I think we value technology too much, over our own intuition.

4

This discussion is not about race relations, as much as it is about the current human ecological crisis in the Black population. It is clear evidence when one group or population of people, are considered endangered by another group or population…

We have to challenge the consciousness of such science.

It looks like a league of unfamiliar saviors who speaks to the current issues, with an unfamiliar tongue, therefore confusing the proper dialog, with more disparity in our vulnerable communities.

We are not surviving because, we are disconnected from the NOW.

We are not surviving because we are not conscious of WHAT IS IMPORTANT RIGHT NOW?

What is most important, is that we direct our attention away from the frustration and anxiety, of what our community does not have, and who is not offering this or that. What are you doing to support the community. We have to become real. Time to get open and free your mind to find deliberate solutions. Easier said than done right… Well, within our consciousness, to get to the solutions and antidotes that our ancestors are speaking to us,  we have to begin with birth work. One woman, one baby, one family at a time.

Building On The Legacy of Sankofa

According To: HEALTHY START INITIATIVE

An Average Week In Oklahoma:

• 957 babies are born
• 150 babies are born to teen mothers (ages 15-19)
• 129 babies are born to mothers who receive inadequate prenatal care
• 71 babies are born low birth weight
• 112 babies are born preterm
• 8 babies die before their first birthday

Oklahoma ranks 6th in the United States on infant mortality.

The infant mortality rates for African Americans in our service area for every 1,000 live births, 13.6% of infants die.

The Time Is NOW! Be  An Ambassador.

Saturday May 7th will be our 1st Annual Black Carpet Community Brunch: Mimosas 4 Moms

By attending our Mimosas 4 Moms event, you will be helping our organization recognize the need of African American women in the field of birth work. In the state of Oklahoma the infant mortality rate has decreased over the last year, but the numbers are still staggering among the African American population. This event is geared to help the community understand how important it is that mothers have support from their 1st thru their 4th trimester.

Oklahoma has one of the highest rates in infant death in the U.S.

Every year about 100 families will tragically experience death of their new baby.

Black and Native American babies are 2 to 3 times more likely to die more than other populations.

We believe by adding more community based educators, that are trained with clear evidence based knowledge, and equipped with strategically designed tools for success, we can help reduce the numbers of mother and infant deaths in the state of Oklahoma for ALL women, with a strong focus on the disparities within the African American communities.

This event is two-fold

•One to celebrate recent graduates our 1st Community Certified Doula Training via our partnering organization Sista Midwife Productions. Class is scheduled for April 22, 23, 24, 29, 30, and May 1.  This event is to also reveal 20 Scholarship Awards for our 2nd training, June 13-17 via the “Accessible Doula Program” through The Matrona. This part of the Mimosas 4 Moms event that will be held in high esteem, the Saturday before Mother’s Day, May 7, 2016. (A limited number of seats are still available for both trainings.) Visit here to register: The Oklahoma Challenge.

•Two to recognize community partnerships and strengthen our network for our 4th annual #GivingTuesday campaign “I Support OKC Birth Workers of Color” scholarship campaign to continue to provide high impact perinatal education to women interested in the respective field of birt work.

So won’t you join us over brunch to see how you, your business, or organization can help us mobilize the need for RADICAL CHANGE in the state of Oklahoma.

RSVP NOW! 

Learn more about our local and virtual vending opportunities request a packet!

***Seating Is Limited

 Conclusion

We are a 100% parent led organization, by a husband and wife team of grassroots social entrepreneurs. We strive to maintain a free thinking environment that supports our artistic passions and goals to build our social welfare organization. And because we do everything from home. (i.e.) Home-birth, Home-school, and even work-from-home online, we really value our family life. We enjoy traveling, performing arts, and quality time with our 3 sons. The fact that we network for a living, is an experience that we aim to share with our core group of 3000 individuals across the globe. We dream in color and often remember the visions vividly. We set our intentions, these become our goals and we believe in our power to see them manifest. So stay connected to our website and let us know if we inspired you with any of our content… Also feel free to gift us with a colorful DONATION in support to keep our site going because we are…

Join us in finalizing details for our 1st Annual “Mimosas 4 Moms” Black Carpet Community Brunch. Become a TIM volunteer… Rebirthing Mother Nature’s Undisturbed Intent…

Expanding Our Scope of CARE

CBD – Green Pain Relief

Dear TIM Community,

In the world of pain management we have new options. Well, the options are old, but now we have a new found connection to their benefits. There is a revolution occurring in the drug therapy world. The lowly hemp plant – so famous for strong rope in the days before nylon and Dacron – is surfacing as nature’s very potent anti-inflammatory. This is promising news for many of those suffering from diseases with inflammation as their root cause. Control the inflammation and the symptoms, as well as the suffering, go away.

Enter Pure-Cannaceutical Hemp Oil Products, a legal dietary supplement by Can-Tek Lab’s in Oklahoma City. Pure-Cannaceutical products are Pharmaceutical Grade Dietary Supplements containing hemp oil derived from the whole medicinal hemp plant, which delivers healthful benefits, without the psychoactive or “high” effect associated with this type of botanical. There is ZERO THC in Pure-Cannaceutical products so urine drug test screens are negative and this product is safe for those with THC allergies. This makes it an appealing option for patients looking for relief from inflammation, pain, anxiety, psychosis, seizures, spasms, and other conditions without disconcerting feelings of lethargy or dysphoria some experience from High THC Cannabis.

Pure-Cannaceutical Hemp Oil Tinctures contain at least 65% CBD – the highest natural amount of CBD of any supplier in the world. The Hemp Oil Oral Tinctures are light, oily liquids that are to be delivered orally by dropper and come in a variety of strengths. The CBD Oral Spray is for intermittent use when feeling particularly stressed or anxious throughout the day. The Hemp Balm and Hemp Salve are both for topical use. The Hemp Balm is applied to painful areas and the Hemp Salve is perfect for rashes or wounds like shingles or psoriasis. There are over 30 examples of health conditions we found that show benefit from CBD use including ADHD, arthritis, diabetes, alcoholism, MS, Chronic Pain, PTSD, depression, osteoporosis, epilepsy, and more.

Read more at: https://maapgh.com/blog/2017/05/cbd-green-pain-relief/

Can Community Centered Health Care Save Black Women From Loosing Out Under the GOP Health Plan

In this article we will see how detrimental the GOP Health Plan is to Black Women’s Health. We believe that it will cause more disparities for the Black population than many are prepared for. Our plan for Community Centered Health Care can be an easy solution. 

After accounting for amendments to the American Health Care Act (AHCA) currently being considered by the U.S. House of Representatives, the latest estimate from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) found that the GOP’s plan still would increase the number of uninsured people in the country to 24 million by 2026.

Even before CBO released its initial report, health policy experts and pundits across the board were warning that more people will be left without insurance than ever before under the GOP’s health bill.

“To be okay with 24 million people not having access to the care they need amounts to nothing more than a blatant disregard for the lives of Americans,” said the Black Women’s Health Imperative, a D.C.-based advocacy organization, in a recent email. “By moving forward with this repeal legislation, Congress is sending a message to the American people that their health is secondary to savings in the federal budget.”

 

 

 

 

>>>READ MORE AT REWIRE<<<

How To Start A Self Care Regime That Will Help You Thrive…

An Invitation To Beauty, Culture, Nature Based Products, and Therapeutic Services 

We’re excited to invite you The TIM Center’s themed event “Mimosas 4 Mom’s.” The goal is to facilitate a day of indulgence for moms and women to experience some of our SIGNATURE products and services, made especially for our members and loyal customers.

 

We are happy to invite at least 15 women to enjoy the beautiful, toxic-free, cultural environment that The TIM Center has to offer. Come and enjoy our four signature service and products that include yoga, massage, natural hair services, and cultural movementClick the image to purchase your ticket. 





Culturally Centered Wellness Services Now Available In Midtown OKC

Our Cultrally-Centered wellness services will change the way women, men, and children experience health and wellness. Whether you become a part of our member partnerships on a large scale, small scale or medium scale, The TIM Center Salon and Community Wellness Spa will help you customize your wellness goals and take your SELF CARE Regime to the next level. Check out our Wellness Program.



RESERVE YOUR SPOT TODAY!

mimosas4moms.eventbrite.com

Your Ticket To Culturally Centered Self-Care

What is self-care and how do we decided what is most necessary for us to thrive in everyday life?

Well here are 13 ways to get started.

1.) Make sure that you celebrate yourself in various ways other than birthday’s or special occasions.

2.) If it feels wrong to you, then don’t do it. This is your Inner-G talking to you, so listen up.

3.) Get plenty of good rest. Sleeping in when you can and taking naps are good for restoring your time and energy sequence.

4.) Use your words with integrity. Speak exactly what you mean and be okay with it.

5.) Stop trying to please everyone. Self preservation is the first law in nature. Apply this law to yourself.

6.) Trust your intuition. This is an innate an primal power that we all possess. Learn how to get deeper into the consciousness of listening for your clues unconsciously.

7.) Talking bad about yourself is the worst! Talking bad about others is just as bad. When speaking about yourself, make sure that you are making positive affirmations to the best parts of you. Just as speaking positively about others can manifest good things for you too. Life and death is REALLY in the power of the tongue.

8.) Dream big, far, and wide. Then go after them without ceasing. When you go after what you want in life, it feels good to have an inspired intention. And self-care is ultimately about doing what feels good.

9.) Saying No, is a good thing. Feel confident that you know what is best for you and that saying no to something right now does not mean you can not revisit the idea at another time.

10.) Saying Yes, is also a good thing. It is actually pretty damn powerful. When you say yes to things, it sends a high vibrational frequency out into the Universe that bounces off of your words and intentions by adding more abundance to your life.

11.) Get InTune to kindness. The best thing you can do is treat yourself. Taking time to perform small acts of kindness for yourself, helps you articulate your ideas of kindness to others in a productive way.

12.) Let go of being in control. The way this life is set up- It is important to learn how to be in the flow. This is a critical part of our commitment to wellness. The more we stress on being in control, the harder it is to be flexible with the magic of managing expectations of others and ultimately ourselves.

13.) Drama and negativity are the assassin’s of good self-care. There are certain things that happen in our lives that lead us back to #12. One way to repell the drama and negatively is to speak power over the situation. Use words that defuse and empower vulnerable or less favorable times. It works like a magnet.

And I have a small BONUS point I want to offer you.

Number 14

LOVE. “Love is thee highest law and only true religion”. This is a great quote that came to me some time ago while on a journey to find out what  (religion) was most suitable for me. In doing so, I found that most reliable spiritual sources all led back to LOVE. Henceforth came the way I define self-care… By showing love to myself first and this affects the way I express value of others in my path.

I hope this post helps those of you who read it. As a tribe of dedicated non-medical spiritual practitioners, we are looking forward to connecting with you on how to move closer towards the empowerment and freedom lifestyle you can and WILL have.

Stay INTUNE!
RaShaunda Lugrand

 

Be sure to join me every Monday and Wednesday at 6:30am for Mantra Yoga (Sunrise Soul Sessions)

Why A Culture Keeper? 

​For the first 5 days of Black History Month I wanted to share with you women who inspired me to be great and passionate about creating a synergistic balance in the culture of birth work and community centered wellness. 
Being a BirthKeeper means you are also a Culture Keeper… This is the steaming pot of social identity and mental health. 
So, over the next 328 days + (1095 days or 3 years to be exact) I will be laser focused on implementation of these legacy systems. It is my goal to make sure that we celebrate the best parts of our culture. It is not enough to begin with overcoming the trauma of the slave generation.   
Our DNA as people of color is riddled with this story 365 days a year. 

It is time to shift the multigenrational social and cultural concentration to one of healing and the necessary deep self-care that it takes to be better. 
Better as a person. Better as a people. Better as a community. Better as a Culture.
Our legacy begins in the cosmos. So how dare we limit ourselves to the point of view shown to us here in America. I am a proud citizen of the United States… Not because American culture is so great… But because I have always been here. My roots do not begin with the innovation of slavery. My heart and mind by way of my ancestors were here before colonization. 
… I will remember Amexam/Northwest Africa. I will remember Turtle Island… And I will not apologize for it. So that my children will know that we are conscious of who we are. And who we have always been… knowing that we are not inferior because, “We are Black History.” ⚫✴♾♛
#BeMagnetic #WeGrowHumans #MaatMind #InTuneMother #CultureKeeper #MELTribe  #TIMMatters #SOILLife #ImBetter

Who Was Francis Cress Welsing? – Day 5 of Black History Month 

 

Dr. Frances Cress Welsing: Looking Back at Her Call to Uproot Racism

Dr. Frances Cress Welsing: Looking Back at Her Call to Uproot Racism

[OP-ED] The controversial psychiatrist’s works unwaveringly challenged White supremacist thought even if it meant making some uncomfortable.

by Gregory Carr, Ph.D, January 5, 2016

For those unfamiliar with the name Dr. Frances Cress Welsing, who passed away at the age of 80 in Washington D.C., she was one our country’s most influential and controversial theoreticians on the subject of race and racism. Her influence did not stem from citations in academic journals, although she gained major recognition after publishing her groundbreaking 1970 essay, “Cress Theory of Color Confrontation (White Supremacy),” which began as a paper presented before members of the American Psychological Association.

Her analysis of the impact of White supremacy was trenchant, hard-hitting and consistent.  But like other scholars and “activists” in the Black community who knew Welsing and studied her work, I saw her as an unswerving champion for African Americans and lover of humanity.

Born in Chicago to a physician and an educator, Welsing was trained in the liberal arts at Antioch College and in medicine at Howard University College of Medicine, where she would eventually serve as faculty. A long-standing private practitioner and pioneer in the fields of child psychiatry and mental health, her longest institutional affiliation was as the Clinical Director and Staff Physician with the Washington D.C. Department of Human Services, where she charted policy and strategies to help emotionally disturbed children at the Hillcrest Children’s Center and the Paul Robeson School for Growth and Development.

Welsing’s work on improving the mental health of African Americans led to a career in the field of race and cultural analysis. The Cress Theory was influenced by the ideas of a Washington, DC acquaintance named Neely Fuller, Jr., and explored the thesis that racism, aggression and hostility stems from White fear of genetic annihilation in an overwhelmingly non-White world.  Fuller and Welsing contended that all of modern global relations were affected by White supremacist ideology and symbology, which they further grouped into nine categories of human activity: economics, education, entertainment, labor, law, politics, religion, sex and war.

She initiated the development for two generations of popular discourse in Black communities on the concept and reality of White supremacy, a status confirmed by her 1991 book The Isis Papers: Keys to the Colors, which was a collection of essays she had written over the previous two decades. It became a perennial non-fiction best seller in Black communities. Her 1974 debate with the Stanford Nobel Laureate, Dr. William Shockley —a proponent of the idea of Black intellectual inferiority—brought her to national attention. One of two articles she wrote for EBONY that year encouraged Black people to “get very quiet and calm and begin to think critically and analytically in a very broad perspective and cease doing push-button reactions to social events that happen around us and that relate negatively to us.”

In fact, this was Welsing’s consistent call— for Black people to take themselves seriously enough to analyze the system in which they lived and its impact on their lives. She contended that systems, rather than episodic challenges, marked the power of White supremacy over its victims.  She came of age in the shadow of Jim Crow; began her professional life during the Black Power era; saw prominence during the post-Civil Rights ideological debates of the 1970s and 80s, and re-ignited new generations searching for direction during the “golden age” of hip hop and the subsequent fracturing and turn of our “post-soul” era.  In some ways, her life and work traces the struggle over self and group identity that Black Americans have been embroiled in since the end of legal segregation. She often said that her intellectual guide was W.E.B. Du Bois who accurately observed that the problem of the modern era would be the global problem of the color line and the reaction of non-Whites to it.

The life and labor of Frances Cress Welsing is just one barometer of the gulf that remains between White and non-White public spheres in a society willfully blind to its inability to engage in “honest dialogues on race.” She weaponized her theories with an agenda that most people are afraid to discuss openly and honestly in polite company. She proposed that Black people avoid marriage until age 35 or older because we are not mature enough to raise children to survive and thrive in a White supremacist system. She said Black people should educate their own children and combine their resources to support Black institutions as a first order of business.

The dimensions of her work that critique Whiteness and its cultural impact fit comfortably today within the larger range of what are now called “Whiteness studies” and even elements of “Critical Race Theory.”  Even the casual reader of the work of academics and writers like David Roediger, Joe Feagin, Harriet Washington or Peggy McIntosh would find Welsing is not alone in her interrogation of the intersections of race, class, gender, biology and power.

But, unfortunately, I don’t believe she will be remembered along with those names.

Much of the controversy around Welsing’s ideas on the topic of race comes from an ignorance of the full range of her actual words and ideas. Many of her critics never met her or read little to none of her work. Some of the more informed criticisms mistake her focus on the roots of White supremacist as a belief in and/or call for “Black Supremacy.”  That critique forms around her discussion of the biological and social function of melanin, which she consistently said was an object of desire and envy of Whites.  Then there were her ideas on sex, primarily her assertion that the gender politics of White patriarchy had promoted homosexuality in Black communities as an attack on the growth and viability of Black families. For Welsing, race, class and gender issues in Black communities traced their roots to the corrosive systemic impact of White Supremacy, at the core of which was patriarchy.

As the life and legacy of Frances Cress Welsing continues to be celebrated and debated, there is no doubt that in the 21st century racism remains an intractable enemy of humanity. In a modern world shaped in the image of Europe and Europeans, no non-White group wants to be, in the language used by Duke University professor and cultural anthropologist, J. Lorand Matory, PhD in “last place.”  Ending racism has never been a matter of polite discourse or easy solutions. People will not agree and paths of most resistance will involve fighting with one another. It appears then that the systemic work of racial oppression will continue, unimpeded, until all people of good will determine that it can only end with our collective active participation. Wouldn’t that then be a fitting tribute to an intellectual warrior like Dr. Frances Cress Welsing.

Gregory Carr, Ph.D. is Associate Professor and Chair of Howard University’s Department of Afro American Studies

Read more at EBONY http://www.ebony.com/news-views/dr-frances-cress-welsing-looking-back-at-her-call-to-uproot-racism-333#ixzz4XruZvfhT 

Who Was Shirley Chisholm? Day 4 of Black History Month

UNBOUGHT & UNBOSSED

12 Facts About Shirley Chisholm, The First African-American to Run For President

Being the first black woman to serve on Congress would be a significant enough accomplishment for a lifetime, but it wasn’t good enough for Shirley Chisholm. Three years after she arrived in Washington, D.C., Chisholm became the first woman to run for president for the Democratic party. When announcing her intention to seek the nomination in 1972, she stated, “I’m a revolutionary at heart now and I’ve got to run, even though it might be the downfall of my career.” Though her campaign was controversial at times, it wasn’t the downfall of her long and noteworthy career. Here are a few things to know about this bold educator-turned-politician.

1. SHE HAD INTERNATIONAL ROOTS

On November 30, 1924, Shirley Anita St. Hill was born in Brooklyn, New York to Ruby Seale and Charles St. Hill. Her mother was a domestic worker who immigrated to the U.S. from Barbados; her father, a factory worker, was originally from Guyana.Being the first black woman to serve on Congress would be a significant enough accomplishment for a lifetime, but it wasn’t good enough for Shirley Chisholm. Three years after she arrived in Washington, D.C., Chisholm became the first woman to run for president for the Democratic party. When announcing her intention to seek the nomination in 1972, she stated, “I’m a revolutionary at heart now and I’ve got to run, even though it might be the downfall of my career.” Though her campaign was controversial at times, it wasn’t the downfall of her long and noteworthy career. Here are a few things to know about this bold educator-turned-politician.

2. SHE WAS BORN IN BROOKLYN, BUT SHE DIDN’T HAVE A NEW YORK ACCENT.

In 1928, Chisholm and her two sisters were sent to live with their grandmother in Barbados, while her parents stayed in New York and worked through the Great Depression. Chisholm attended a one-room schoolhouse on this island in the West Indies. In addition to receiving a British education, she picked up an accent, which remained slight but noticeable throughout her life.

3. EDUCATION HAD A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON HER LIFE …

Chisholm returned to the U.S. in March 1934 at age 9 and resumed with a public-school education. Following high school, she studied sociology at Brooklyn College and earned her BA in 1946. (She was a prize-winning debater in college, a skill that would serve her well throughout her political career.) She continued her education at Columbia University and earned an MA in early childhood education in 1952. While she was still a student at Columbia, she began teaching at a nursery school and married Conrad Chisholm in 1949. They would later divorce in 1977.

4. … SO MUCH SO THAT SHE BEGAN HER PROFESSIONAL CAREER IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION.

Library of Congress

After working at the nursery school, Chisholm worked her way through the teaching ranks and by 1953 was the director of two day care centers, a position she held until 1959. Her expertise and experience led to her role as an educational consultant for New York City’s Division of Day Care from 1959 through 1964.

5. HER POLITICAL CAREER—WHICH STARTED AT THE NEW YORK STATE LEGISLATURE—WAS REVOLUTIONARY FROM THE BEGINNING.

Chisholm was a member of the League of Women Voters and the Bedford-Stuyvesant Political League before she ran for the New York State Assembly in 1964. When she won, Chisholm became the second African-American woman to serve on the state legislature. From 1965 to 1968, Chisholm served as a Democratic member and focused on unemployment benefits for domestic workers and education initiatives.

6. REDISTRICTING INSPIRED HER RUN FOR CONGRESS.

Chisholm set her sights on Congress when redistricting efforts gave Brooklyn a new congressional district. Not one to shy away from the public, Chisholm used to drive through neighborhoods while announcing, “This is fighting Shirley Chisholm coming through.” She defeated three candidates in the primary election, including a state senator, before defeating well-known civil rights activist James Farmer in the general election. This victory made her the first African-American woman elected to Congress, and she would go on to serve seven terms.

Political buttons from the collection of Alix Kates Shulman. Image credit: Polly Shulman.”

 7. SHE HAD A WAY WITH WORDS AND ESTABLISHED HERSELF AS OUTSPOKEN AND READY FOR CHANGE EARLY IN HER FIRST TERM.

She was known for her bold declarations. After her upset victory in the congressional election, she boasted, “Just wait, there may be some fireworks.” And she delivered on that promise. Given her campaign slogan “Unbought and unbossed,” it should come as no surprise that Chisholm quickly made her presence known in Congress. She spoke out against the Vietnam War within the first few months of her arrival and said she would vote against military spending. When she was initially relegated to the House Agricultural Committee, she requested a new assignment, claiming that she didn’t think she could best serve her Brooklyn constituents from that position.

 

After directly addressing House Speaker John McCormack on the matter, she was reassigned to Veterans’ Affairs, and then moved to the Education and Labor Committee in 1971. True to her desire to bring about change, Chisholm hired all women for her office, half of whom were African-American. She was also a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus as well as the National Women’s Political Caucus.

Chisholm with Rosa Parks (L) between 1960 and 1970. Image Credit: Library of Congress

8. HER PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN WAS UNEXPECTED AND HISTORIC.

Chisholm formally announced her intention to seek the Democratic presidential nomination in January 1972, making her the first African-American to run for a major party and the first woman to vie for the Democratic nomination. During her speech, which she delivered in her hometown of Brooklyn, Chisholm said, “I am not the candidate of black America, although I am black and proud. I am not the candidate of the women’s movement of this country, although I am a woman and I am equally proud of that…I am the candidate of the people of America, and my presence before you now symbolizes a new era in American political history.”

Although her campaign wasn’t as well-funded as her competitors’, Chisholm did get her name on the primary ballot in 12 states and won 28 delegates in primary elections. She received about 152 delegates at the Democratic National Convention, coming in fourth place for the party.

9. THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL WAS FULL OF CHALLENGES.

Chisholm likely expected challenges during her campaign, and she certainly encountered a fair amount. She received multiple threats against her life, including assassination attempts, and was granted Secret Service protection to ensure her safety. Chisholm also had to sue to be included in televised debates.

There was even controversy where there could have been encouragement. Her decision to run for the Democratic nomination caught many members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) off-guard, and they weren’t happy that she acted before a formal and unified decision could be made. But Chisholm was done with waiting; when the subject of the CBC came up on the night she announced her campaign, she told the crowd, “While they’re rapping and snapping, I’m mapping.”

10. SHE HAD AN UNLIKELY SUPPORTER IN GEORGE WALLACE.

Chisholm was well aware that her biggest source of support came from women and minorities and often advocated on their behalf, so it shocked many of her supporters and constituents when she visited political rival George Wallace after an assassination attempt sent him to the hospital—and ultimately left him paralyzed—in 1972. Wallace, who was governor of Alabama, was known for his racist comments and segregationist views, but Chisholm checked on him. She said she never wanted what happened to him to happen to anybody else.

Ultimately, their friendship benefited the public when Wallace came through for Chisholm on an important piece of legislation in 1974. She was working on a bill that would give domestic workers the right to a minimum wage. Wallace convinced enough of his fellow Southern congressmen to vote in favor of the bill, moving it through the House.

11. FOLLOWING RETIREMENT, CHISHOLM DIDN’T SLOW DOWN.

Chisholm retired from Congress in 1982, but leaving the political arena didn’t mean she was done making a difference. Although she planned on spending more time with her second husband, Arthur Hardwick Jr., she also returned to teaching at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts and continued to speak at colleges across the country.

Chisholm passed away on January 1, 2005 at age 80 in Ormond Beach, Florida. She is buried in Buffalo, New York, and the inscription on the mausoleum vault in which she is buried reads “Unbought and Unbossed.”

12. SHE CONTINUES TO GARNER ACCOLADES FOR HER TRAILBLAZING WORK.

Chisholm was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1993. In 2014, the U.S. Postal Service debuted the Shirley Chisholm Forever Stamp as part of the Black Heritage Series. A year later, President Barack Obama posthumously awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and there is talk of a movie being made about her life. But Chisholm never doubted what legacy she wanted to leave behind, once saying, “I want history to remember me…not as the first black woman to have made a bid for the presidency of the United States, but as a black woman who lived in the 20th century and who dared to be herself. I want to be remembered as a catalyst for change in America.”

 

ARTICLE RETRIEVED FROM: m.mentalfloss.com/article